Archive for February, 2010

Panoverflow.com is a website we launched recently dedicated to answering questions about panoramic photography. It’s now getting more useful – new questions and answers are added every day. You get points for being helpful, or for asking good questions - it’s a nice way to show you’re an expert – and it’s a great place for beginners to ask questions. Yuval (one of the project leaders of Hugin panorama stitching software) called it “the best thing to happen to the panorama community in years”. Not bad!

The Panoverflow site is based on the idea of Stackoverflow.com, a Q and A site for programmers created by Jeff Atwood and Joel Spolsky. Panoverflow is running on a spin off software called StackExchange that has been released to allow third parties to build communities similar to Stack Overflow around other topics.

Here are the most interesting questions on the site with links to their answers:

How to shoot a spherical panorama without having the tripod in the image?

(Scott:) If you are using a panoramic head such as the Nodal Ninja, I recommend taking a shot or two straight down while the camera is still on the tripod. I’ve never managed to have the camera in the exact right position to eliminate the parallax for the straight down hand held shot. Those extra shots can… Continue reading

How was this Paragliding panorama taken?

(Scott:) I found this panorama today by Martin Hertel, and it has been driving me insane all day. I love it, but can’t figure out how it was taken.

Read the answer from the author of the panorama

How to do action panoramas?

(Leif:) People – actually all living beings – is a nuisance in panoramas! No doubt about it. They never stay where you want and you get all these ghosts to edit out. On a more serious note: I have been wondering if there is a way to do “action” photos – a faster way to get the shots. I am working… Read the rest of the question and the answers

How to do aerial panoramas using a pole?

(Rey:) What would be a good approach to start doing pole panoramas? how high can anyone go without being too risky for myself and others. Read the answers

How to calibrate my panoramic equipment?

(Yuv:) There are many different ways to calibrate lenses to panorama heads. What is your preferred method? is there a tutorial online? please link to it. Read the answers


What are the next questions going to be? Join the community.

Visit Panoverflow.com

Update: Get a 25% DISCOUNT with this code when ordering: 4F75CD.

You can buy premium quality panoramic prints of most of the panoramas on 360Cities.net. We’ve chosen a few outstanding examples and included them here. These framed art prints are perfect for an office or home.

Sizes range from 18″ (30cm) wide to 90″ (228 cm) wide.

Just click on the image to preview and order a print in the size of your choice. Worldwide delivery.

Amedee Island Coral Reef Memory Bubble by Richard Chesher

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Bamboo Raft on Yulong River by yunzen liu

Bamboo Raft on Yulong River by yunzen liu

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Snowy River Yosemite Valley California by Lee Casalena

Snowy River Yosemite Valley California by Lee Casalena

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Sunset from Prabello by Andrea Biffi

Sunset from Prabello by Andrea Biffi

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Lanzarote Mirador del Rio Dachterrasse by Jan Koehn

Lanzarote Mirador del Rio Dachterrasse by Jan Koehn

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Riverpielinen in Joensuu by Rami Saarikorpi

Riverpielinen in Joensuu by Rami Saarikorpi

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Evening at Dry End of Lake Bicaz in Romania by Michael Pop

Evening at Dry End of Lake Bicaz in Romania by Michael Pop

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Si-o-seh Pol - 33 Arches Bridge - in Isfahan, Iran, at Night by Ramin Dehdashti

Si-o-seh Pol, The 33 Arches Bridge at Night, in Isfahan, Iran, by Ramin Dehdashti

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Boingboing published two 360 Cities panoramas of power-plant control rooms. From the article:

Jeffrey sez, “I’ve got two fantastic power plants to show you, in 360 spherical photography. First let’s travel back to the 1950′s or so. Photographed by our member Noel Jenkins, he says, “The control room of the substation at Lea Marston, Warwickshire, is the only surviving building following the demolition of the three coal fired power stations that made up the huge Hams Hall power station complex. …

Read the full article

(thanks Cory!)