Archive for July, 2013

360° panorama by Jürgen Diemer.
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360° panorama by Bane Obradović.
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After going to Tokyo 10 months ago, I have finally finished two of the largest images I have ever made (and a couple of the very largest photos ever made in the world, period)

These images have been a real labor of love (love and frustration…) and have ended up taking much longer to do than originally planned for. I want to thank all of my colleagues for being so patient about letting me work on them for such a long time. Hopefully the result is worth it.

The first one, shot from the roof of the lower observatory on

Tokyo Tower

is the second-largest image I’ve ever made. That’s 600,000 pixels wide. Just a reminder that your mobile phone shoots photos around 3000 pixels  wide. The largest possible size of an image in Photoshop is 300,000 pixels. So, this image was very difficult to assemble into a single seamless image. In fact, it has never existed as a single image file. To view it on the web, the image is cut into more than a million little “tiles” which are loaded as needed depending on your view (similar to google maps, for example)

I made a short video showing a few details of the photo, just to give you an idea of how much you’re able to see. Take a look:

 

 

The second one is shot from the tallest accessible skyscraper in Tokyo – the Roppongi Hills Mori Tower. Here are a few screenshots from this image.

360° panorama by Larry Huppert.
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Many visitors make the pilgrimage to the top of Cadillac Mountain in Acadia National Park during their visit. Sunrise and sunset from this vantage point can be spectacular.
360° panorama by David Rowley.
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360° panorama by Juergen Stellmacher.
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An anechoic chamber in the EMC (electromagnetic compatibility) testing is an RF shielded room which is either partially (semi-anechoic) or fully lined with RF absorber material. The EMC absorber chamber differs from the conventional acoustic anechoic chamber, characterized that the absorber on its walls are able to absorb electromagnetic waves - not only sound waves. The absorbers convert the electromagnetic field energy into heat energy. The metallic walls shield the interior of the chamber from the outside world and are used in EMC testing of electromagnetic shielding and interference. Advantage of an anechoic chamber compared to an open area test site is its closed environment in which high field strength measurements as well as electromagnetic field emissions measurements on a very low level are possible. Anechoic chambers are used by industry to perform radiated emissions and radiated immunity testing of electrical and electronic equipment to various international standards.Panorama made and published with kind permission of TUV Rheinland (Shanghai) Co., Ltd. / EMC Laboratory.
360° panorama by Joby Catto.
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This uncredited art installation sits next to Veiðilyesa fjord, alongside Strandavegur, the unmetalled road which heads north as it skirts the eastern flank of Strandir. Made from found objects (driftwood, fishing debris and other beachcombed items) it's an eye-catching and distinctive fixture on the otherwise wild and unspoilt route to Djúpavík and Krossnes.The coastline in the West Fjords region of Iceland is littered with driftwood logs, which ocean currents carry from northern Siberia. It takes around seven years for this wood to make its way across the northern seas before being thrown up on the rocky beaches skirting the fjords in the north-west. Historically the wood was a valuable natural resource in a country with limited native forests: by law it belongs to the owner of the land on which it is cast up.  
360° panorama by Jan Dunlop.
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Evening on the south end of Sandy Bat Beach. Taken with a Canon 6D on a 6m pole.
360° panorama by Jan Dunlop.
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Evening on the south end of Sandy Bat Beach. Taken with a Canon 6D on a 6m pole.
360° panorama by Pascal Moulin.
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