Archive for the ‘Great Panoramas’ Category

360° panorama by zeljko soletic.
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360° panorama by zeljko soletic.
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360° panorama by Carsten Arenz.
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Riomaggiore is one of the five villages of the Cinque Terre. All are best to be visited by train as parking spaces are rare, if at all available. This panorama was takenon one of the two platforms of the railway station. The station is probably the most unnormal as it was build mainly inside a tunnel.
360° panorama by Heiner Straesser - derPanoramafotograf.com.
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Yılanlı Kilise (=Snake Church) in the Soğanlı valley. The frescoes are from the 11th and 13. century.
360° panorama by Deema.
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360° panorama by Deema.
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360° panorama by Deema.
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360° panorama by Willy Kaemena.
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Wikipedia: "Vank Cathedral was one of the first churches to be established in the city's Jolfa district by Armenian deportees settled by Shah Abbas I after the Ottoman War of 1603-1605. The varying fortunes and independence of this suburb across the Zayandeh rood and its eclectic mix of European missionaries, mercenaries and travelers can be traced almost chronologically in the cathedral's combination of building styles and contrasts in its external and internal architectural treatment.Construction is believed to have begun in 1606, and completed with major alterations to design between 1655 and 1664 under the supervision of Archbishop David. The cathedral consists of a domed sanctuary, much like a Persian mosque, but with the significant addition of a semi-octagonal apse and raised chancel usually seen in western churches. The cathedral's exteriors are in relatively modern brickwork and are exceptionally plain compared to its elaborately decorated interior."
360° panorama by Willy Kaemena.
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Iran - Abarkuh, yakhchal (ice house) By 400 b.C., Persian engineers had mastered the technique of storing ice in the middle of summer in the desert. The ice could be brought in during the winters from nearby mountains, but more commonly they had a wall made along an east-west direction close to the yakhchal. In winter, the qanat water was channelled to the north side of the wall. The shadow of the wall made the water freeze more quickly so more ice was produced per winter day. Ice was stored in a specially designed, passively cooled refrigerator. This was a large underground space (up to 5,000 m3) that had thick walls (at least two meters at the base) made out of a special mortar called sārooj, composed of sand, clay, egg whites, lime, goat hair, and ash in specific proportions, and which was resistant to heat transfer. This mixture was thought to be completely water impenetrable. The space often had access to a qanat, and often contained a system of windcatchers or wind towers that could easily bring temperatures inside the space down to frigid levels in summer days. The ice was then used to chill treats for royalty during hot summer days.
360° panorama by Willy Kaemena.
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Wikipedia: "The Nasīr al-Mulk Mosque (Persian: مسجد نصیر الملك‎ - Masjed-e Naseer ol Molk) or Pink Mosque is a traditional mosque in Shiraz, Iran, located in Goade-e-Araban place (near the famous Shah Cheragh mosque). The mosque was built during the Qājār era, and is still in use under protection by Nasir al Mulk's Endowment Foundation. It was built by the order of Mirza Hasan Ali Nasir al Molk, one of the lords of the Qajar Dynasty, in 1876 and was finished in 1888. The designers were Muhammad Hasan-e-Memar and Muhammad Reza Kashi Paz-e-Shirazi.The mosque extensively uses colored glass in its facade, and it displays other traditional elements such as panj kāseh-i (five concaves) in its design. It is also named in popular culture as Pink Mosque due to the usage of beautiful pink color tiles for its interior design."