360° panorama by Andrew Bodrov.
Click the image to open the interactive version.

NASA's Mars Exploration Program (Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS)Curiosity Rover's Self Portrait at "Buckskin" Drilling SiteCuriosity Rover have reached milestone 3 years on Mars!As of today, Sol 1065, August 4, 2015, Curiosity has driven some 11 kilometers and taken over 256,000 amazing images. This panorama 92 exposures taken by the rover's Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) during the Sol 1065 of Curiosity's work on Mars (August 4, 2015).Other panoramas of Mars by Curiosity rover:http://www.360cities.net/sets/curiosity-mars

Advertising agencies, digital publishers, mobile and VR developers among others all use 360Cities to search for and license panoramas for use in campaigns, publications, games etc. You can increase the chances that your images will be selected for licensing by our customers by asking the following questions:

 

  1. Are your images enabled for licensing? It’s easy to do – here’s how.

  2. Have you added tags to all your images? Our customers often do searches specific to the type of image, or image content, and not simply geographic location. Adding tags helps them find your images.

  3. Have you entered your metadata correctly? Correctly spelled titles, a good description, and proper map placement all increase the chances of your images being licensed. Read all about proper metadata here.

  4. Have you published any panos recently? Probably the single most important thing you can do to increase your chances of licensing panoramas is to publish lots of beautiful, well-executed images of remarkable and interesting places and events – wherever you are!

If any of your images have been licensed in the past, you will have received a royalty payment from 360Cities via Paypal. Now you can review details of your licensing history in your account page by clicking Settings / Licensing.

 

360° panorama by Andrew Bodrov.
Click the image to open the interactive version.

From December 2014 until February 2015 Sölden was one of the locations where filming for the new James Bond Movie (Spectre) was been taken place.
360° panorama by ErcanKapkac.
Click the image to open the interactive version.

360° panorama by Gary Davies.
Click the image to open the interactive version.

HMS M33 is a former Royal Navy monitor - a small, shallow-draught gunboat with two oversize 6-inch guns, designed for coastal bombardment. Built in just seven weeks, she is one of only three British warships that survive from the First World War.In 1915 she was despatched to the Mediterranean where she was used in support of the bloody Gallipoli Campaign. She and five sister-ships were later involved in the Russian Civil War in 1919.Following a period as a mine-laying training ship, for which she was renamed HMS Minerva, she spent the remainder of her active life in Portsmouth Harbour in various support guises, such as a floating fuel bowser, workshop and offices. These unglamorous roles ensured her survival and listing as part of the National Historic Fleet.Now restored and painted in the dazzle colours from her war years, she is now located in No.1 Dock at the Historic Dockyard in Portsmouth, adjacent to HMS Victory.http://www.nmrn.org.ukhttp://www.historicdockyard.co.uk

The images here are all 360º Panoramas. Click to open them.

CLICK IMAGE TO OPEN 360º PANORAMA. Photographed by Harbert F. Austin Jr. from the roof of the Kodo elementary School October, 1945. Location: Nekoya-cho. Distance from hypocenter: approx. 760m. The start of restoration work by the citizens in the aftermath of the bomb can be observed as people cross bridges, ride bicycles, and walk about.

One day last year, a friend of mine stumbled across one of these images. Knowing that I am always interested in seeing historical 360º photos, he sent me the link. Panoramic photography has existed for more than a century, but I had not seen these before.  Looking at these images, turning them around in a circle, is the strongest reminder I have had in a very long time of the real power of photography. The image above, even more so than all the other ones, is one of the most heartbreaking images I have ever seen.

I contacted the man running the site where the image was located. His name is Steven Starr, and he teaches at the University of Missouri. His website, www.nucleardarkness.org, is a resource for anyone who is interested in the danger of existing nuclear arsenals currently held in the world.

Steven directed me to Mari Shimomura of the Hiroshima Peace Museum. I explained to Ms. Shimomura of my desire to publicize these images more widely, and she was kind enough to send me high-resolution scans of photos comprising five different 360º panoramas shot about 6 months after Hiroshima was destroyed. The images were shot by three different American photographers, and one Japanese photographer.

The Japanese photographer, Shigeo Hayashi, said this:

On October 1, 1945, I stood at the hypocenter of the Hiroshima atomic bombing and made a slow revolution. In that instant I had a difficulty grasping that this city had been felled by a single explosion. Nothing in my experience had prepared me to conceive of that magnitude of destructive force.

Working as an army engineer for three years, I had dealt with explosive materials on a daily basis, and I thought I knew their power. Standing there, I simply could not accept at an emotional level that a single bomb had done all this.

(taken from Shigeo Hayashi’s “Approaching Ground Zero” in Hiroshima and Nagasaki: the Atomic Bombings as Seen through Photographs and Artwork, Nihontosho Center.)

The panorama below was shot from a watchtower of the Hiroshima Prefectural Commerce Association. The building you see in this image still stands today:

CLICK IMAGE TO OPEN 360º PANORAMA. Photographed by Shigeo Hayashi from a watchtower of the Hiroshima Prefectural Commerce Association, October 5, 1945. Location: Moto-machi. Distance from hypocenter: approx. 260m.

(You can also see more recent photos of the above place on Google Maps.)

 

CLICK IMAGE TO OPEN 360º PANORAMA.  Photographed by Shigeo Hayashi from the roof of new Chugoku Shimbun building.

The following two images were taken by American photographers (one of them is anonymous)

CLICK IMAGE TO OPEN 360º PANORAMA.  Photographed by H. J. Peterson in November 1945 from the roof of the Fukuya Department Store. Distance from hypocenter: approx. 710m.

 

Here is Ground Zero (the Hypocenter)

CLICK IMAGE TO OPEN 360º PANORAMA.  Ground Zero. Photographed by US Army. from the hypocenter area – Shima Hospital October, 1945

 

Special thanks to the Hiroshima Peace Museum.

Special thanks to Steven Starr / nucleardarkness.org.

The Curiosity robot created by NASA landed on Mars three years ago. It has been sending images to us and our Maestro photographer, Andrew Bodrov, has been using them to create these amazing panoramas from out of this world. Andrew has even created a gigapixel of the Martian surface.

We have compiled these three years of Martian images on 360cities.net. Enjoy the view of the red planet!

NASA’s Mars Exploration Program (source images: NASA/JPL-Caltech)

 

Mars Panorama – Curiosity rover: Martian solar day 2

With its rover named Curiosity, Mars Science Laboratory mission is part of NASA’s Mars Exploration Program, a long-term effort of robotic exploration of the red planet. Curiosity was designed to assess whether Mars ever had an environment able to support small life forms called microbes. In other words, its mission is to determine the planet’s “habitability.”

 

Mars Panorama – Curiosity rover

This panorama was released 23.08.2012 and updated 30.08.2012. I have enhanced colors to be corresponded with colors used by NASA. This is very hi-resolution panorama 30000×15000 pixels. I used to stitch it 138 source images (1200x1200px) from the 34-millimeter Mast Camera on NASA’s Curiosity rover.

 

Mars Gigapixel Panorama – Curiosity rover: Martian solar days 136-149

4 billion pixels panoramas of Mars. The images for panorama obtained by the two rover’s Mast Cameras:

  • Narrow Angle Camera (NAC), which has a 100 mm focal length
  • Medium Angle Camera (MAC), which has a 34 mm focal length

The mosaic, which stretches 90000×45000 pixels, includes 295 images from NAC taken on Sols 136-149 and 112 images from MAC taken on Sol 137.

 

Mars Panorama – Curiosity rover: Martian solar day 177

Curiosity Rover’s Self Portrait at “John Klein” Drilling Site: This self-portrait of NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity combines 66 exposures taken by the rover’s Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) during the Sol 177th of Curiosity’s work on Mars (Feb. 3, 2013). The rover is positioned at a patch of flat outcrop called “John Klein”, which was selected as the site for the first rock-drilling activities by Curiosity. The self-portrait was acquired to document the drilling site.

 

Mars Panorama – Curiosity rover: Martian solar day 437

The images for panorama obtained by the rover’s 34-millimeter Mast Camera. The mosaic, which stretches about 30,000 pixels width, includes 101 images taken on Sol 437.

 

 

Mars Panorama – Curiosity rover: Martian night

Digital Art Compilation

  • Curiosity Rover’s Self Portrait at “John Klein” Drilling Site NASA’s Mars Exploration Program (Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS)
  • VISTA telescope: 9 billion pixel photo of a Milky Way European Southern Observatory (Image credit: ESO/VVV Consortium, Ignacio Toledo, Martin Kornmesser)

 

Mars Panorama – Curiosity rover: Martian solar day 613

Curiosity Rover’s Self Portrait at “Windjana” Drilling Site. Everybody’s doing selfies: Curiosity’s Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) took frames on Sol 613 (April 27, 2014).

Windjana is a possible target for drilling on a sandstone outcrop at Mount Remarkable. The rover’s robotic arm is not visible in the mosaic. MAHLI, which took the component images for this mosaic, is mounted on a turret at the end of the arm. Wrist motions and turret rotations on the arm allowed MAHLI to acquire the mosaic’s component images. The arm was positioned out of the shot in the images or portions of images used in the mosaic.

The images for full panorama obtained by the rover’s 34-millimeter Mast Camera. The mosaic, which stretches about 30,000 pixels width, includes 138 images taken on Sol 610.

 

Mars Panorama – Curiosity rover: Martian solar day 739

The images for panorama obtained by the rover’s 34-millimeter Mast Camera. The mosaic, which stretches about 30,000 pixels width, includes 133 images taken on Sol 739. Curiosity has almost reached an ingress point into Armargosa Valley. To get into the valley, Curiosity will have to cross some fairly rough terrain, but this also provides an opportunity to analyze the bedrock as we go.

 

Mars Panorama – Curiosity rover: Martian solar day 868

 

Curiosity Rover’s Self Portrait at “Mojave” Drilling Site. This panorama combines 65 exposures taken by the rover’s Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) during the Sol 868 of Curiosity’s work on Mars (January 14, 2015).

 

Mars Panorama – Curiosity rover: Martian solar day 952

Chapter 14: Pahrump Hills. The images for panorama obtained by the rover’s 34-millimeter Mast Camera. The mosaic, which stretches about 30,000 pixels width, includes 135 images taken on Sol 952. The Curiosity Mars Science Laboratory rover just passed the 10 kilometers (6.214 miles) mark for total driving since its touchdown in August 2012. The panorama was acquired at the end of a marathon “Artists Drive” en-route to “Logan Pass”.

 

Mars Panorama – Curiosity rover: Martian solar day 1065

Curiosity Rover’s Self Portrait at “Buckskin” Drilling Site. Curiosity Rover have reached milestone 3 years on Mars! As of today, Sol 1065, August 4, 2015, Curiosity has driven some 11 kilometers and taken over 256,000 amazing images. This panorama 92 exposures taken by the rover’s Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) during the Sol 1065 of Curiosity’s work on Mars (August 4, 2015).

360° panorama by Alexey Miroshnikov, GRADES PHOTO.
Click the image to open the interactive version.

We are pleased to present a new compass feature for those panoramas which have an edited heading. A letter “N” for North will be visible on the compass on the lower left corner of the panorama.

 

It’s easy to select the new option:

  • Go to panorama > edit and edit the heading as before. Tick the box “Show Heading on embedded compass.”

 

Heading, Show heading on embedded compass

 

Then, your panorama will display the N in the compass control:

 North Compass

 

Q: I have hundreds/thousands of panoramas, do I have to do that with each panorama manually?

A: No, you don’t have to. You can use the batch edit mode.

Account dashboard >  Batch edit > select the images > and then select “Show Heading on embedded compass for all selected panoramas”, and click on “Edit images!”.

360° panorama by luis davilla.
Click the image to open the interactive version.

puerta del sol square in madrid from tower bell clock. spain