Posts tagged ‘NASA’

The Curiosity robot created by NASA landed on Mars three years ago. It has been sending images to us and our Maestro photographer, Andrew Bodrov, has been using them to create these amazing panoramas from out of this world. Andrew has even created a gigapixel of the Martian surface.

We have compiled these three years of Martian images on 360cities.net. Enjoy the view of the red planet!

NASA’s Mars Exploration Program (source images: NASA/JPL-Caltech)

 

Mars Panorama – Curiosity rover: Martian solar day 2

With its rover named Curiosity, Mars Science Laboratory mission is part of NASA’s Mars Exploration Program, a long-term effort of robotic exploration of the red planet. Curiosity was designed to assess whether Mars ever had an environment able to support small life forms called microbes. In other words, its mission is to determine the planet’s “habitability.”

 

Mars Panorama – Curiosity rover

This panorama was released 23.08.2012 and updated 30.08.2012. I have enhanced colors to be corresponded with colors used by NASA. This is very hi-resolution panorama 30000×15000 pixels. I used to stitch it 138 source images (1200x1200px) from the 34-millimeter Mast Camera on NASA’s Curiosity rover.

 

Mars Gigapixel Panorama – Curiosity rover: Martian solar days 136-149

4 billion pixels panoramas of Mars. The images for panorama obtained by the two rover’s Mast Cameras:

  • Narrow Angle Camera (NAC), which has a 100 mm focal length
  • Medium Angle Camera (MAC), which has a 34 mm focal length

The mosaic, which stretches 90000×45000 pixels, includes 295 images from NAC taken on Sols 136-149 and 112 images from MAC taken on Sol 137.

 

Mars Panorama – Curiosity rover: Martian solar day 177

Curiosity Rover’s Self Portrait at “John Klein” Drilling Site: This self-portrait of NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity combines 66 exposures taken by the rover’s Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) during the Sol 177th of Curiosity’s work on Mars (Feb. 3, 2013). The rover is positioned at a patch of flat outcrop called “John Klein”, which was selected as the site for the first rock-drilling activities by Curiosity. The self-portrait was acquired to document the drilling site.

 

Mars Panorama – Curiosity rover: Martian solar day 437

The images for panorama obtained by the rover’s 34-millimeter Mast Camera. The mosaic, which stretches about 30,000 pixels width, includes 101 images taken on Sol 437.

 

 

Mars Panorama – Curiosity rover: Martian night

Digital Art Compilation

  • Curiosity Rover’s Self Portrait at “John Klein” Drilling Site NASA’s Mars Exploration Program (Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS)
  • VISTA telescope: 9 billion pixel photo of a Milky Way European Southern Observatory (Image credit: ESO/VVV Consortium, Ignacio Toledo, Martin Kornmesser)

 

Mars Panorama – Curiosity rover: Martian solar day 613

Curiosity Rover’s Self Portrait at “Windjana” Drilling Site. Everybody’s doing selfies: Curiosity’s Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) took frames on Sol 613 (April 27, 2014).

Windjana is a possible target for drilling on a sandstone outcrop at Mount Remarkable. The rover’s robotic arm is not visible in the mosaic. MAHLI, which took the component images for this mosaic, is mounted on a turret at the end of the arm. Wrist motions and turret rotations on the arm allowed MAHLI to acquire the mosaic’s component images. The arm was positioned out of the shot in the images or portions of images used in the mosaic.

The images for full panorama obtained by the rover’s 34-millimeter Mast Camera. The mosaic, which stretches about 30,000 pixels width, includes 138 images taken on Sol 610.

 

Mars Panorama – Curiosity rover: Martian solar day 739

The images for panorama obtained by the rover’s 34-millimeter Mast Camera. The mosaic, which stretches about 30,000 pixels width, includes 133 images taken on Sol 739. Curiosity has almost reached an ingress point into Armargosa Valley. To get into the valley, Curiosity will have to cross some fairly rough terrain, but this also provides an opportunity to analyze the bedrock as we go.

 

Mars Panorama – Curiosity rover: Martian solar day 868

 

Curiosity Rover’s Self Portrait at “Mojave” Drilling Site. This panorama combines 65 exposures taken by the rover’s Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) during the Sol 868 of Curiosity’s work on Mars (January 14, 2015).

 

Mars Panorama – Curiosity rover: Martian solar day 952

Chapter 14: Pahrump Hills. The images for panorama obtained by the rover’s 34-millimeter Mast Camera. The mosaic, which stretches about 30,000 pixels width, includes 135 images taken on Sol 952. The Curiosity Mars Science Laboratory rover just passed the 10 kilometers (6.214 miles) mark for total driving since its touchdown in August 2012. The panorama was acquired at the end of a marathon “Artists Drive” en-route to “Logan Pass”.

 

Mars Panorama – Curiosity rover: Martian solar day 1065

Curiosity Rover’s Self Portrait at “Buckskin” Drilling Site. Curiosity Rover have reached milestone 3 years on Mars! As of today, Sol 1065, August 4, 2015, Curiosity has driven some 11 kilometers and taken over 256,000 amazing images. This panorama 92 exposures taken by the rover’s Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) during the Sol 1065 of Curiosity’s work on Mars (August 4, 2015).

Good luck Curiosity!

Presenting, the brand new panorama from Mars created by Andrew Bodrov, our official Martian panomaker.

This new interactive panorama (Sol 530) from NASA’s Curiosity Mars rover shows the Dingo Gap – about 3 feet (1 meter) high sand dune.

The team operating the Curiosity rover will likely drive the rover over a dune and across a valley with fewer sharp rock hazards than alternative routes. The Curiosity Mars rover may traverse the valley, on the east side of the dune, this month. We’d like to wish Curiosity a good trip!


Mars Panorama – Curiosity rover: Martian solar day 530

 

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS, NASA’s Mars Exploration Program. The images for panorama obtained by the rover’s 34-millimeter Mast Camera. The mosaic, which stretches about 30,000 pixels width, includes 101 images taken on Sol 530.

Discover other panoramas of Mars by Curiosity rover:

  • Sol 437 (Martian solar day 437)
  • Sol 177 (Self-portrait of NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity)
  • Sol 136-149 (First 4 billion pixels panorama of Mars)
  • Sol 4 (First color panorama of Mars)
  • Sol 2 (First panorama of Mars by Curiosity rover)

360Cities PRO member  has just published another stunning panorama stitched from images taken by the Curiosity Rover on Mars. The rover has been enjoying digging into the Mars surface and has collected some samples of the Martian rocks.  Sometimes, 360Cities photographers are out of this world!

NASA’s Mars Exploration Program (Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS) 

Curiosity Rover’s Self Portrait at “John Klein” Drilling Site

 


Mars Panorama – Curiosity rover: Martian solar day 177

Andrew has added a nice description of it:

This self-portrait of NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity combines 66 exposures taken by the rover’s Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) during the Sol 177th of Curiosity’s work on Mars (Feb. 3, 2013).

The rover is positioned at a patch of flat outcrop called “John Klein”, which was selected as the site for the first rock-drilling activities by Curiosity. The self-portrait was acquired to document the drilling site.

The rover’s robotic arm is not visible in the mosaic. MAHLI, which took the component images for this mosaic, is mounted on a turret at the end of the arm. Wrist motions and turret rotations on the arm allowed MAHLI to acquire the mosaic’s component images. The arm was positioned out of the shot in the images or portions of images used in the mosaic.

At the bottom of this panorama is the hole in a rock. The drilling took place on Feb. 8, 2013, or Sol 182, Curiosity’s 182nd Martian day of operations. The sample-collection hole is 0.63 inch (1.6 centimeters) in diameter and 2.5 inches (6.4 centimeters) deep. The “mini drill” test hole near it is the same diameter, with a depth of 0.8 inch (2 centimeters).

The images for full panorama obtained by the rover’s 34-millimeter Mast Camera. The mosaic, which stretches about 30,000 pixels width, includes 113 images taken on Sol 170 and an additional 17 images taken on Sol 176.

Wired magazine has a piece about this panorama today. And here are some more 360Cities panos of the red planet.