Interesting articles about VR – week #33

‘Once You See the Images, You Understand.’ Japanese Students Recreated Hiroshima Bombing in Virtual Reality

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It’s a sunny summer morning in the city of Hiroshima, Japan. Cicadas chirp in the trees. A lone plane flies high overhead. Then a flash of light, followed by a loud blast. Buildings are flattened and smoke rises from crackling fires under a darkened sky.


Does the Virtual World Advertising Work in Metaverse

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Advertising in virtual reality allows you, the viewer, an impactful experience that leaves real memory traces as an effect of their intense emotional and behavioural integration. Donning a metaverse avatar lets you interact with others in an authentic context with no physical Restraints.


AR|VR|MR Mixed Reality News: MAGIC LEAP DEMO, LEAP MOTION, NIANTIC EP. 1

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In the first episode of mixed reality news we talk about the magic leap demo, leap motions OPEN SOURCE AR headset, unreal engine for AR and VR, and Niantic’s new AR SDK and more!


Pico Raises $24M Series A Funding, Goblin 2 Standalone Headset Announced

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Pico Interactive, the Beijing-based standalone VR headset manufacturer, successfully completed a ¥167.5 million RMB (~$24.7 million) Series A funding round. To accompany the news, Pico also announced their second iteration of their Goblin standalone headset, dubbed G2.


INSIDE MAGIC LEAP’S QUEST TO REMAKE ITSELF AS AN ORDINARY COMPANY (WITH A REAL PRODUCT)

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IT’S NEARLY 11 pm on a Monday in late July, and we are in the back room of an Italian restaurant not far from the Fort Lauderdale beach. It’s a place he often takes visitors who make the trek from Los Angeles or San Francisco to Mickey Mouse’s Florida homeland for a demo. Oscar-winning visual effects wizard John Gaeta, known for his work on the Matrix and later at Lucasfilm’s ILMxLAB, sits to my right, having joined Magic Leap last year. Former Samsung executive Omar Khan, who is on day 11 in his new role as chief product officer, sits to my left. Everyone is in a good mood because finally, I mean finally, after two years of boastful promises followed by two years of near silence, the company is on the cusp of revealing a headset that actual developers—and any old person in the wild—will be able to buy and bring home.


History of Virtual Reality

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In recent years, Virtual Reality (VR) technology has finally reached the masses. 2016 was called “The Year of VR” as several actors released their Head-Mounted Displays (HMDs) on the consumer market. While HTC, Oculus and Playstation delivered high quality HMDs that require external computers to run, the year also opened up for high quality mobile VR. Both Google with their Daydream View and Samsung/Oculus with their GEAR VR have provided an easier step for consumers to enter the world of VR. These mobile VR solutions offer better internal measurement units than the simpler Cardboard devices, and also feature simple controllers for interaction. We now see the market spreading out both in quality and accessibility: in 2018 we have both seen the coming of the HTC Vive Pro, a more expensive high-end HMD with increased resolution, and the Oculus Go, which is a reasonably-priced ($200) stand-alone 3DOF (3 Degrees of Freedom) HMD for the starters.


After almost a decade and billions in outside investment, Magic Leap’s first product is finally on sale for $2,295. Here’s what it’s like.

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The company has spent almost a decade working on technology that superimposes computer-generated images over the real world in your field of vision. It has raised more than $2.3 billion from powerhouses such as Alphabet’s Google, Alibaba, Saudi Arabia and J.P. Morgan. Google’s CEO Sundar Pichai sits on the board. The company and its founder have been the subject of glowing coverage from publications like Wired and Forbes. And all of this — the money and the press — came before Magic Leap had ever showed its product to the general public.


Robert Long Loses 138 pounds playing Beat Saber and He’s Still Going

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We here at VRFI write about success stories like this so frequently it never ceases to amaze us when we hear of a story like Bigrob7605’s. The power of Virtual Reality is that it is an ideal platform to create adherence to a fitness routine. The bonus is it is inspiring people to make changes to improve their health!


Watch An AI-Controlled Avatar “Learn” How To Dribble In Real Time – Huge Implications For Games, AR/VR, And Real Life Robotics

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What you’re looking at above appears to be a pretty big breakthrough in artificial intelligence — an avatar “learning” how to dribble in real time through AI. DeepDribble is a project from researchers at DeepMind and Carnegie Mellon, and the idea is to demonstrate how an AI-controlled avatar can acquire the complex and subtle set of integrated physical skills and coordination that humans take for granted:


I TRIED MAGIC LEAP AND SAW A FLAWED GLIMPSE OF MIXED REALITY’S AMAZING POTENTIAL

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When you write about augmented reality headsets, you’re supposed to start by describing something impossible — like a pastel dinosaur stomping its feet in a quiet office space in Florida. This dinosaur is made of fist-sized blocks that look like candy, and the office belongs to Magic Leap, a mysterious startup that’s been working in near-total secrecy for seven years. I should clarify that the dinosaur also isn’t real. It exists only in the lenses of the Magic Leap One, a pair of goggles that Magic Leap hopes will replace phones, computers, and every other high-tech screen in our lives.


 

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